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Dr. Vladimir Dobrosavljevic

Professor and Director of Condensed Matter Science - Theory, NHMFL, Ph.D., Brown University, 1988

     
 


Educational Background:
1988 Ph. D., Physics , Brown University , Providence, RI
1985 M. Sc., Physics , Brown University, Providence, RI
1983 B. Sc., Physics University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia

Research Interests:
The subject of metal-insulator transitions came to a renewed focus in the last eighteen years, with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, which triggered much activity in the study of “bad metals”. Many of the materials in this family consist of transition metal or even rare earth elements, corresponding to compounds which are essentially on the brink of magnetism. Here, conventional approaches proved of little help, but recent research has lead to a veritable avalanche of new and exciting ideas and techniques both on the experimental and the theoretical front.

In the last twelve years, a systematic new approach to strong correlations has been developed, based on dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) methods. Our recent results have demonstrated that all the basic localization mechanisms and processes can be described within extended DMFT framework, and have produced a number of results of direct experimental relevance.

These include:

• Theory for Anderson localization effects in presence of strong correlations.

• Description of localization-induced Griffiths phases leading to non-Fermi liquid
(and/or spin liquid) metallic behavior.

• Theory describing how glassy behavior of electrons emerges in the vicinity of disorder-driven metal-insulator transitions.

Some of the subjects that we have introduced have, in the last few years, become topics of central interest and much activity. This is especially true for glassy phenomena that emerge in many electronic systems with disorder. Topics related to non-equilibrium quantum dynamics are subjects of several upcoming major international workshops and meetings. For example, I acted as the principal organizer of the workshop “Complex Behavior in Correlated Electron Systems” held at the Lorentz Center in Leiden (the Netherlands) in August 2005. I believe that this direction for research offers a great deal of promise and will continue to attract increased attention in the coming years. Materials where these phenomena are of central importance are surprisingly numerous, ranging from two dimensional electron gases in MOSFETs, diluted magnetic semiconductors, CMR manganites and high Tc cuprates. Our theoretical approaches are very flexible and useful tools that should play a central role in this emerging field.

figure 1

Quantum Glassiness
In the last few years, fascinating examples of complex ordering around the metal-insulator transition are starting to emerge, due to advances of both the experimental probes and the theoretical tools available.
Left panel: Percolative conduction in the half-metallic ferromagnetic and ferroelectric mixture (La, Sr)MnO3.
Central panel: Inhomogeneous charge distribution revealed by STM spectroscopy on underdoped cuprate Ca2−xNaxCuO2Cl2.
Right panel:
Strikingly similar “stripe glass” ordering is observed in a computer simulation of an appropriate model. Developing analytical tools to describe such phenomena is one of the principal goals of our research efforts.

Professional Experience:
2006-present, Professor, Florida State University
2001-2006, Associate Professor, Florida State University
1995-2001, Assistant Professor, Florida State University
1991-1995, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Rutgers University
1989-1991, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland
1988-1989, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Brown University
1984-1988, Research Assistant, Brown University

Awards, Honors & Service:
Developing Scholar Award (2003)
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow (1997-1999)

 
Vladimir Dobrosavljevic
 
contact 611 KEN
phone (850) 644-9755, 4-5693
email
web Visit Vladimir Dobrosavljevic personal web site
 
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