Courses in Undergraduate Bulletin

Courses Listed in Undergraduate Bulletin
 

Definition of Prefixes

AST—Astronomy

PHY—Physics

PHZ—Physics: Continued

PSC—Physical Sciences

 

Undergraduate Courses

Courses for Non-Science Majors

AST 1002.    Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3). This course provides general acquaintance with some of the facts, concepts and scientific methods of astronomy. As a liberal study course, the goal is to help students learn some basic facts of astronomy as well as gain an appreciation of astronomy as a science, the universe, and the current scientific ideas about its history and its future.

AST 1002L.    Planets, Stars, and Galaxies Laboratory (1). Corequisite: AST 1002. This course, which consists of outdoor and indoor labs, provides a hands-on introduction to astronomy as an observational science. In the outdoor labs students learn how to make observations and measurements of planetary, stellar and galactic objects using either your unaided eyes, binoculars or a telescope. The indoor labs acquaint them with the telescope, the coordinate system used to locate astronomical objects on the sky, the motion of objects in the sky and other basic concepts of astronomy.

PHY 1020.    Physics and Technology for Future Presidents (3). This course is for non-science majors and contains the essential physics students need in order to understand today's core science and technology issues, and to become the next generation of world leaders. The course empowers students possessing any level of scientific background with the tools they need to make informed decisions and to argue their views persuasively with anyone, expert or otherwise.

PHY 1020L.    Physics and Technology for Future Presidents Laboratory (1). Corequisite: PHY 1020. This course is designed to accompany the PHY 1020 lecture course. Although the lab material generally follows the lecture, some topics may be treated earlier or later in the lab syllabus.

Courses for Non-Physical-Science Majors
PHY 2053C.    College Physics A (4). Prerequisites: MAC 1114 and MAC 1140 with grades of "C–" or better or suitable mathematics examination placement score. Corequisite: PHY 2053L. This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence for life-sciences students and is intended to provide a general knowledge of the basic concepts of physics relating to mechanics, energy, gravity, rotational motion, fluids, heat, thermodynamics, vibrations and waves. Physics is based on problem solving and this class involves both solving word problems and performing laboratory exercises. The level of mathematical skill necessary to complete this course is a strong proficiency with algebra (especially word problems) and trigonometric functions; calculus is not used.

PHY 2053L.    College Physics A Laboratory (0).

PHY 2054C.    College Physics B (4). Prerequisite: PHY 2053C or PHY 2048C. Corequisite: PHY 2054L. This course is an introduction to electromagnetism, light, and modern physics for non-physical-science majors. Two lectures, one recitation, and one laboratory each week. Students who have previously received credit for PHY 2049C may not register for PHY 2054C.

PHY 2054L.    College Physics B Laboratory (0).

PHZ 4702.    Biomedical Physics I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C or PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. This course is the first in a series of two introductory courses on the applications of physics in biology and medicine. The course discusses applications of classical mechanics, hydrodynamics, and thermodynamics to motion, to the structure of the musculoskeletal, respiratory, and circulatory systems, as well as to the biology of the cell. The course is intended for students preparing for graduate studies in the biological sciences, for medical school, or for medical professions such as physical therapy and nursing.

PHZ 4703.    Biomedical Physics II (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C or PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. This course is the second in a series of two introductory courses on the applications of electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics to the nervous system, to vision, to modern topics in biomolecular research, as well as to microscopy and to modern biomedical imaging techniques. The course is intended for students preparing for graduate studies in the biological sciences, for medical school, or for medical professions such as physical therapy and nursing.

Physics for K–12 Educators
PSC 2801C.    Physical Science for EC/EE Teachers (4). This course is designed for prospective elementary and early childhood education majors. The course combines physics and chemistry and the laboratory is integral to the course. Students work in groups in a hands-on, minds-on approach to learning physical science.

PHY 3012.    Learning Assistantship in Physics (2). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. Corequisite: PHY 3101. This course focuses on apprentice teaching in an inquiry-based physics learning environment under the direction of a faculty member. In addition, the course provides an examination of theoretical issues such as conceptual development, conceptual change, collaborative learning, technology in education, and students' conceptions of various topics in physics, as well as practical issues encountered in facilitating learning, managing the classroom, formative and summative assessment, and differentiating instruction in a collaborative environment.

General Physics for Physical-Science Majors
PHY 2048C. General Physics A (5). Prerequisite: MAC 2311. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.

PHY 2048L.    General Physics A Laboratory (0).

PHY 2049C.    General Physics B (5). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and MAC 2312. This course is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory.

PHY 2049L.    General Physics B Laboratory (0).

Courses for Majors
AST 3721L.    Astrophysics Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. This course offers an introduction to experimental methodology, data analysis and interpretation, calibration techniques, scientific model validation, as well as data presentation and communication of results. The laboratory experiments have astrophysical relevance and include magnetic fields, optical interference and diffraction, wave polarization, line spectroscopy, photoelectric effect, and radioactive decay.

AST 4211.    Introduction to Astrophysics (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2312 and PHY 2049C; science majors only. This introductory course covers key aspects and concepts of modern astronomy and astrophysics, including coordinate systems, instrumentation, our sun and planets, stars and stellar evolution, binary systems and variable stars, stellar explosions, as well as galaxies and the evolution of the universe.

AST 4217.    The Physics of Stars (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3101 and PHY 3221. This course serves as an introduction to star formation, evolution, and death through simple theoretical modeling and through a strong emphasis on the underlying physics concepts.

AST 4341.    Hydrodynamics and Plasma for Astrophysics (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3221 and PHZ 3113; or instructor permission. This course is an introduction to the hydrodynamics, plasma physics, and magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) necessary for an understanding of astrophysical processes. No prior knowledge of hydrodynamics is required.

AST 4414.    Cosmology and Structure Formation (3). Prerequisites: AST 4211 and PHY 3101. This course covers the evolution of the universe from the "Hot Big Bang" to the current epoch. Topics include cosmological expansion, the Hubble constant and other cosmological parameters, the microwave background radiation, early universe nucleosynthesis, the growth of large-scale structure, the "dark ages" and the re-ionization of the universe, the horizon and other fine-tuning problems, distance determinations, redshift surveys, inflation, cosmological acceleration, as well as dark matter and dark energy.

AST 4419.    Extragalactic Astronomy (3). Prerequisite: AST 4211. This course offers a survey of the physics and phenomenology of galaxies and galaxy structures. Topics include stellar populations, classifications systems, interstellar and intergalactic material, chemical abundances and evolution, galaxy formation, structure, dynamics and evolution, extragalactic distance determination, interacting systems, as well as active galactic nuclei.

AST 4722.    Observational Techniques in Astrophysics (3). Prerequisite: AST 4211. This course covers principles and techniques used in obtaining modern astronomical data. Includes an overview of current and next-generation astronomical instrumentation, discussion of calibration schemes and observing strategies, and an introduction to analysis techniques.

PHY 1090r.    Discovering Physics (1). This course is an introduction to being and becoming a physicist. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

PHY 3045.    Physics Problem Solving (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. Corequisites: PHY 3101 and MAP 2302, or instructor permission. This course includes instruction and practice in solving advanced, calculus-based, multi-step problems in classical mechanics and E&M.

PHY 3091.    Communication in Physics (2). Prerequisite: PHY 2048C. Corequisite: PHY 2049C. This course consists of instruction and practice in oral communications for physicists. Students choose physics topics in consultation with instructor and present them to the class.

PHY 3101.    Intermediate Modern Physics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C. This course focuses on special relativity, quantum properties of light and matter, and origins of the universe.

PHY 3221.    Mechanics I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3045, PHY 3101, and MAP 2302. Corequisite: MAC 2313. This course focuses on Newtonian mechanics of a single particle, oscillations, nonlinear oscillations and chaos, gravitation, central force motion, systems of particles, and motion in noninertial reference frames.

PHY 3424. Optics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C. This course focuses on topics such as: geometrical optics, wave optics, optical instrumentation, properties of light, lasers, fiber optics.

PHY 3802L.    Intermediate Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. This course focuses on experiments in optics, modern physics, and electricity and magnetism. The emphasis is on the development of experimental technique, assessment of the validity of experimental data, and the development of skill in the written presentation of results.

PHY 4222.    Mechanics II (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHZ 3113, or instructor permission. This course focuses on Lagrangian dynamics, Hamiltonian dynamics, dynamics of rigid bodies, coupled oscillations, waves in one-dimensional continuous systems, and special relativity.

PHY 4323.    Electricity and Magnetism I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3221 and PHZ 3113. This course focuses on electric fields for static charge distributions, electric fields in matter, magnetic fields for constant current configurations, magnetic fields in matter, and Maxwell's equations.

PHY 4324.    Electricity and Magnetism II (3). Prerequisite: PHY 4323. This course focuses on electromagnetic wave solutions to Maxwell's equations; reflection, transmission, dispersion, and absorption of electromagnetic waves; scalar and vector potentials; electromagnetic dipole radiation; electrodynamics; and relativity.

PHY 4513.    Thermal and Statistical Physics (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313, PHY 3221, and PHZ 3113. This course studies the fundamental laws of thermodynamics and their application to simple systems, the kinetic theory of an ideal gas, and is an introduction to the classical and quantum statistical mechanics of weakly interacting systems.

PHY 4604.    Quantum Theory of Matter A (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3101, PHY 3221, and PHZ 3113. This course focuses on quantum mechanics and its applications to particles, nuclei, atoms, molecules, and condensed matter.

PHY 4605.    Quantum Theory of Matter B (3). Prerequisite: PHY 4604. This course focuses on quantum mechanics and its applications to particles, nuclei, atoms, molecules, and condensed matter.

PHY 4822Lr.    Advanced Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PHY 3802L. This course consists of experiments in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other areas of modern physics. Students are expected to work without detailed instructions. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours for special projects arranged in advance between the student and the instructor.

PHZ 3113.    Mathematical Physics (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3045 and PHY 3101. Corequisite: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305. This course focuses on: mathematical methods applied to physical systems; vectors, specialized techniques of integration, integral transforms, special functions, boundary-value problems, numerical methods.

PHZ 3400.    Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. This course covers topics such as: crystal structures, phonons and thermal properties, electron energy bands, metals, semiconductors, superconductors, and magnetism.

PHZ 4151C.    Computational Physics Laboratory (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305, PHY 3221, and PHZ 3113. This course introduces students to the use of computers to solve computationally intensive problems, including basic instruction in physics problem solving using numerical solutions of differential equations, numerical integration, Monte Carlo methods, linear algebra, and symbolic algebra. Provides instruction in computational techniques and software development skills and practice in using network and software development tools including telnet, ftp, spreadsheets, databases, code management tools, and the World Wide Web.

PHZ 4316.    Nuclear Astrophysics (3). Prerequisite: AST 4211. Corequisite: PHY 4604. This course offers an introduction to the role of nuclear reactions and decays in astrophysics. Topics cover the origin of elements in the context of Big Bang, major burning stages in the life of a star, stellar explosions, and processes in interstellar matter.

PHZ 4390.    Particle and Nuclear Physics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305 and PHY 3101, or instructor permission. This course examines the properties of nuclei and particles, nuclear and particle decays, the Standard Model, and accelerator and detector techniques.

PHZ 4470. Materials Characterization (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313, PHZ 3400, and PHZ 4471. This course is an introduction to a large variety of materials characterization techniques that have been developed and are currently used in materials science research.

PHZ 4471. Materials Synthesis and Applications (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313, PHY 3101, and PHZ 3400. This course is an introduction to materials synthesis and materials applications.

PHZ 4601.    Special and General Relativity (3). Prerequisite: PHY 3221. Corequisite: PHY 4323. This course examines the special theory of relativity, tensor analysis and curvature, general theory of relativity, experimental tests, black holes, gravitational radiation, and cosmology.

Research and Special Topics
AST 4218r.    Astrophysics Seminar (1). Prerequisite: AST 4211. This seminar introduces students to current research topics in astronomy and astrophysics through presentation and discussion of recently published research papers, their own research work, and occasional review publications. Topics cover observational and theoretical astrophysics alike. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

PHY 1921r.    WIMSE Colloquium (1). This course is a colloquium for the Women in Math, Science and Engineering Living-Learning Community. Students must be members of the WIMSE Living-Learning Community.

PHY 3949r.    Experiential Learning (0). (S/U grade only.) This course is a non-credit experiential learning course, which offers students an opportunity to gain "real world" on-the-job work experience related to a specific academic field of study. Students must register for this course through the FSU Career Center.

PHY 4905r.    Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

PHY 4910r.    Research Participation (1–3). This course consists of projects in theoretical or experimental physics arranged in advance between the student and a member of the teaching faculty of the physics department. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

PHY 4936r.    Special Topics in Physics (1–3). Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor permission. This course consists of advanced applications of physics to topics of interest, such as relativity, astrophysics, particle physics, advanced solid state physics, or advanced nuclear physics. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

PHY 4937r.    Undergraduate Tutorial in Physics (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Upper-division undergraduate standing. This course consists of selected topics in modern physics. Examination of primary research literature. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours. A maximum of eight students allowed in each tutorial.

PHY 4970r.    Honors Work (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

PHY 4975.    Senior Thesis (1). Pre- or corequisite: PHY 4910. This course consists of a written report and an oral presentation discussing research work done under PHY 4910. The grade is assigned by a committee of three faculty members.

PHY 4990r.    Senior Seminar (1). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. Corequisites: PHY 3091 and PHY 4910r. In this course, students present results of their physics research to the class for discussion. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.