Special Seminars

We have many special seminars this semester.

Check back often for changes.

  • Tue, 01/16/2018 9:45 701 Keen
    • Series Condensed Matter Seminar
    • Speaker Changlani, Hitesh
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  • Fri, 01/19/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Giardino, Pier Paolo
    • Affiliation Brookhaven National Lab
    • Title Precision physics in the LHC era
    • Abstract Currently the only new particle discovered at the LHC is the Higgs boson. Its properties, in particular its couplings to other particles, seem consistent with the Standard Model predictions. This scenario, together with the lack of new physics signals at the LHC, can be discouraging. However the capabilities of the LHC as a precision physics machine should not be underestimated, and a strong program of precision measurements together with precision calculations of the Standard Model predictions could bring us information on beyond Standard Model physics even if the LHC does not see any resonance. In this talk I will give a review of such theoretical studies, focusing in particular on the Electro Weak precision observables and the measurement of the Higgs potential.
  • Mon, 01/22/2018 10:30 701 Keen
    • Series Condensed Matter Seminar
    • Speaker Souslov, Anton
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  • Thu, 01/25/2018 9:45 701 Keen
    • Series Condensed Matter Seminar
    • Speaker Halasz, Gabor
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  • Fri, 01/26/2018 3:45 UPL101
    • Series Mott Lecure
    • Speaker Aeppli, Gabriel
    • Affiliation ETH Zürich, EPF Lausanne, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland
    • Title Mott Lecture: The next life of silicon
    • Abstract The 20th century has been distinguished by the silicon-based information revolution, where bits are encoded as charges which are manipulated and stored via field effect transistors. The continued exponential growth of information technology based on straightforward extrapolations of this paradigm is not guaranteed, and there has therefore been a search for both alternative paradigms and materials. The new paradigms entail exploitation of spin and orbital degrees of freedom, including related quantum phenomena. While “exotic” materials have been successfully used to demonstrate some of the associated physics, we show here that silicon may be an excellent host for the new effects. In particular, laser cooling and electromagnetic traps have led to a revolution in atomic physics, yielding dramatic discoveries ranging from Bose-Einstein condensation to quantum control of single atoms. Because it is a semiconductor of extraordinary cleanliness which can be acquired at low cost, silicon can also be thought of a poor man’s atom trap. We describe here the beginnings of the science of silicon as atom trap, where the trapped atoms are the donor impurities. Key tools, enabling the visualization and manipulation of the impurity quantum states, are free electron lasers and scanning tunneling microscopes.
  • Mon, 01/29/2018 10:30 701 Keen
    • Series Condensed Matter Seminar
    • Speaker Skinner, Brian
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  • Thu, 02/01/2018 9:45 701 Keen
    • Series Condensed Matter Seminar
    • Speaker Zang, Yi
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  • Mon, 02/05/2018 10:30 701 Keen
    • Series Condensed Matter Seminar
    • Speaker Mandal, Subhasish
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  • Fri, 02/09/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Tsai, Yuhsin
    • Affiliation University of Maryland
    • Title Embracing The Dark Side: Hidden Naturalness in Colliders and Cosmology
    • Abstract The existence of a hidden sector, in which all the new particles are neutral under the strong, weak and electromagnetic forces, is an intriguing possibility for new physics. Within this framework, theories of hidden naturalness can provide elegant solutions to the fundamental mysteries of the hierarchy problem and dark matter. At present, these theories are only mildly constrained by data. However, as I will show, scenarios of this type can lead to striking signatures in collider and cosmological searches. I will explain how to use the current and future data from long-lived particle searches at the LHC, and from Large Scale Structure measurements, to uncover the existence of a hidden sector that solves deep physics puzzles.
  • Tue, 02/13/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Elor, Gilly
    • Affiliation University of Washington, Seattle
    • Title What is the Universe made of? -- The quest to discover Dark Matter
    • Abstract As a theoretical particle physicist, I seek to address some of the most fundamental questions about our Universe. In this talk, I will address perhaps the most basic one --"What is the Universe made of?” We have discovered that the matter which makes up things like stars, plants, and people accounts for only 5 percent of the energy contents of the Universe. I will introduce the vast evidence in support of this claim, and argue that this indicates the presence of yet undiscovered "Dark Matter” particles. What these new particles may be and how to experimentally discover them is critical to making progress in our pursuit of understanding the Universe. I will discuss various possibilities for what kinds of new particles Dark Matter could be, and the possible mechanisms that could have yielded the population we know is around in the Universe today -- with a focus on the "Hidden" or "Dark" sector framework. I will then discuss my approach to three ways we can hope to experimentally discover Dark Matter: at colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, direct searches in deep underground laboratories, and indirect searches for the effect of Dark Matter on astrophysical data observed with telescopes. These novel approaches could ultimately lead to a discovery of Dark Matter.
  • Fri, 02/16/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Tobioka, Kohsaku
    • Affiliation Stonybrook University
    • Title The Higgs Boson as an Essential Probe of New Physics
    • Abstract The Higgs boson was discovered at the LHC as the last piece of the Standard Model. However, we need new physics beyond the Standard Model due to incompatible experimental evidence: neutrino mass, dark matter, inflation and theoretical hints: the naturalness problem, the strong CP problem, the flavor puzzle. When we investigate new physics, the Higgs boson is an essential probe because its property is not fully explored yet and also it is theoretically connected to many problems. Therefore, in this talk, I explore topics related to the Higgs bosons, from both theoretical and experimental points of view. I discuss Higgs coupling measurements, especially the first direct bound on the Higgs decay to a charm quark pair. Also, based on the naturalness problem of the Higgs mass, I introduce two avenues in model building: an approach with new symmetry and another approach using cosmological dynamics. I address experimental efforts to test such new physics.
  • Tue, 02/20/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Schulze, Markus
    • Affiliation University of Berlin
    • Title Fundamental Physics in the LHC Era and the Quest for Precision
    • Abstract Run-I of the Large Hadron Collider culminated in the striking discovery of the Higgs Boson. After a maintenance shutdown, Run-II is in full swing with upgraded technology and collisions at never reached energies. The exploration of this new energy regime in the upcoming two decades, together with the enormous luminosity, will provide extremely precise measurements that ultimately allow us to shed new light on open questions about our universe. Theoretical physics plays a crucial role for the success of this enterprise as it allows drawing rigorous connections between measured observables and the fundamental dynamics. In this talk, I will outline some of my research topics on precision calculations and conceptual developments. I will present applications of these theoretical works on the phenomenology of the Higgs boson and top quarks.
  • Fri, 02/23/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Febres Cordero, Fernando
    • Affiliation University of Freiburg
    • Title Particle Physics at the Energy Frontier: Discovery Through Precision Physics
    • Abstract A decade of dedicated studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has brought us a refined understanding of the dynamics of fundamental particles up to the TeV scale, with a clear highlight being the discovery of the Higgs boson and its role in the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Increasingly precise data/theory comparisons for a large amount of observables have been at the center of this progress. It is expected that in years to come larger data sets will allow even more precise measurements. We are aiming at answering some of the outstanding open questions in high-energy physics, like what is the nature of dark matter or why there is such large baryon asymmetry in the universe. In this talk I will present some crucial theoretical advances, like on-shell techniques and the development of numerical unitarity, which have paved the way to produce precise predictions for complex processes necessary for standard model measurements and new physics searches at the LHC. Even more, I will describe recent progress in our understanding of multi-loop amplitudes in QCD which will open new possibilities for discoveries through precision at high energy colliders.
  • Tue, 02/27/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Degrande, Celine
    • Affiliation CERN
    • Title Tracking down New Physics
    • Abstract While new physics is needed to explain many issues of the SM, no new particle has been discovered yet. In this presentation, I will discuss how theoretical input can improve new physics searches at colliders and in astrophysics. First, new collider observables and the corresponding accurate predictions for classes of new physics can help to discover or to corner new physics. Secondly, new physics predictions can be included in PDF fit to test if new physics could be hiding in the PDF and eventually to propose new measurements to disentangle the two. Finally, polarization of high energy photons offers a brand-new approach to discover or to characterize new physics.
  • Fri, 03/02/2018 3:30 701 Keen
    • Series High Energy Seminar
    • Speaker Katz, Andrey
    • Affiliation CERN
    • Title Beyond the Standard Model: Search for a Shadow World
    • Abstract All currently observed collider phenomena are consistently explained by the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. However, there are good reasons, both experimental and theoretical to consider Physics Beyond the SM at the TeV scale. The SM violates the principle of naturalness, which is a fundamental theoretical problem. I will explain this problem and discuss experimental strategies for testing some its possible solutions. One is a popular scenario, supersymmetry, which involves a major extension of space-time symmetry and manifests itself in new particles with SM charges at collider. Another solution that I will discuss is the Twin Higgs, which in general predicts sterile particles at colliders. Remarkably, I will demonstrate that it also gives rise to observable signals. Both supersymmetry and the twin Higgs scenario have their own challenges, and I will present novel strategies for both these scenarios. The SM alone cannot account for observed matter-antimatter asymmetry and requires new physics. I will analyze the possibility of generating the baryon asymmetry during the Electroweak phase transition and show that this idea can be probed at the LHC and future colliders via Higgs precision measurement. I will also present a novel mechanism for generating the baryon asymmetry at temperatures below the electroweak temperature, which can be probed via the gravitational wave signals in future interferometers. Finally the SM does not have a dark matter candidate, but it can naturally accommodated by certain extensions of the SM at the TeV scale. I will review some of these scenarios and emphasize the experimental signatures in the direct detection experiments, neutrino telescopes and the surveys of stellar motion.
  • Tues, 03/06/2018 4:30 UPL 101
    • SeriesSPS Seminar
    • Speaker David Collins
    • Affiliation FSU
    • Title What's the deal with Dark Matter?
    • Abstract I'll be giving an overview of the observational evidence for Dark Matter at an introductory level. I'll discuss what is observed, and why a particle is the most likely candidate.
  • Friday 03/23/2018 - Sunday 03/25/2018
    • Series Society of Physics Students Zone 6 Meeting
    • Abstract This is an annual meeting attended by physics majors from Puerto Rico, and the states of Florida, Alabama and Georgia. Typically, 60 to 80 students attend each meeting. The dates for this year's meeting are March 23rd to March 25th. Activities will include tours of the Maglab, HPMI and the John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Lab, talks by students and a few FSU professors, a poster session, a planetarium show, and a session of `Paint your Research'.
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